One more read

Saving books through “Little Libraries”

For the past several years Julia and I, when visiting our son and family in Texas, have been taking books with us to read on the way and while we were in Texas. Rather than bringing the books we had finished back to Virginia with us, we placed them in a Little Library within sight of our son’s house.  One year we decided to take additional books to just to put in the Library. Recently we discovered there are little libraries in Harrisonburg, too.

Booksavers (Gift & Thrift on Mt. Clinton Pike*), where I volunteer, keeps many books from an early trip to the landfill.  Our donors bring their books (as well as CDs and DVDs) to our store for resale.  Booksavers recycles for paper, books that are not saleable (due to minor blemishes, etc.) or have not sold after time on the shelves.  But some of us at Booksavers have wanted to give these books “One More Read”.

Harrisonburg “little libraries”

People of Harrisonburg are giving books one more read by putting them in “little libraries” –free libraries, usually along the street. Some belong to the “Little Free Libraries” organization**.  Some of the “little libraries” are not a part of the Little Free Library organization:

Collicello south of 3rd

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Collicello near 3rd
Collicello just north of 5th. (Beneventos)
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Cornerstone Lane off Rt. 11 north near/at Cornerstone School

East Market just east of Mason at Strite Donuts—called “Free Library” (John Shafer, Steward) ++

East Wolfe between Myrtle and Sterling (Mary Lou Wylie) https://www.whsv.com/home/headlines/Little-Free-Libraries-Encourage-Kids-to-Read-During-Summer-Months-262338191.html

Eastern Mennonite University near the corner of Parkwood and Park.  Stocked by Hartzler Library.

Emmanuel Episcopal Church, 660 South Main Street, near MLK, Jr. Way.

Friendly City Food Coop, Mason and Wolfe –bookshelves near the cash registers and windows‡

Immanuel Mennonite Church, 400 Kelly Street – near Hill Street.

Madison Street-between Jefferson and Monroe–stocked with the help of Vine & Fig Tree—a very colorful Library ‡

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Mountain View Elementary School, Rawley Pike, Rockingham County

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Myrtle and Kelly – Stocked by Gus Bus people

Our Community Place – (boxes inside occasionally) outside–proposed

Pale Fire Brewery off Bruce Street between Chesapeake and Liberty – inside

Ridgeway Mennonite Church, 546 E Franklin St

Sentara RMH Wellness Center, 2500 Wellness Drive, HNBG

 

South Dogwood just south of Neyland Avenue ++

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West Market (33 West) near North Dogwood

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Lincolnshire Drive – North end (this one is actually in Rockingham County)

Other locations stocked by Booksavers people:

Children’s Clothes Closet

Refugee Resettlement

Roberta Webb Preschool, Kelly Ave. (for school participants only)

Salvation Army, 895 Jefferson Street (available on distribution days)

Sentara Hospital:  One near the Main entrance and one near Emergency entrance

Waterman School, 451 Chicago Avenue (for students only)

[If you know of others, please let me know at dave528va@gmail.com.]

Free book offer

These people and organizations are to be commended for their work setting up the little libraries and in giving books “one more read”.  Booksavers can supplement what the owner/stewards of the existing little libraries are putting in their libraries.  The books available may have blemishes, may be out of date (at least, some people think so), or just don’t sell in the store.  (Books that are not claimed, Booksavers sells to paper recycling.) To see what Booksavers might have to give your “little library”, make an appointment with Booksavers’ Manager, Amy Rohrer at (booksaversmanager@gmail.com ).  Currently, Booksavers’ employee Sue stocks an unofficial “little library” at Waterman School and several others.  Gary helps stock the one on East Wolfe.  David has been delivering books to Our Community Place, Salvation Army, Vine & Fig Tree and others. Julia has sent books to Refugee Resettlement and Children’s Clothes Closet.  None of these are official library stewards, just book and people lovers. We have distributed more than fifty boxes of books since the One More Read program started in October of 2018.

Booksavers has many books worthy of “one more read”.  We will make these available to library owners or stewards (stewards of the Little Free Libraries they maintain are required by Little Free Library Org.). Volunteers are ready to deliver books to the Little Library stewards.  Additional volunteers are welcome.  For more information text David Alleman at 540-705-1437, or email at dave528va@gmail.com

More little libraries needed

Observers (nationally) of the Little Library movement have noted that most of these libraries are located in more affluent neighborhoods.  This appears to be the case in Harrisonburg as well.  We would like to locate Little Libraries in neighborhoods not currently served.   Harrisonburg does have a few little libraries in less affluent areas.  Madison Street, Myrtle and Kelly, Myrtle and Hill, and Ridgeway Mennonite on Franklin.  Possible sites are near Our Community Place, Lucy Sims School, and the Salvation Army on Ashby Avenue. Stewards/caretakers are needed for these locations.

What more is needed?  The Little Library organization asks $40 registration fee to make the library an official Little Free Library. This fee pays for instructions, publicity and signs.   Additional funds are needed for the materials for the library box, the post and the cement.  The cost would be under $75.  Finally, people are needed to install the little libraries.

Ridgeway Mennonite Church, 546 E Franklin St, Harrisonburg is the latest to install a Little Library. They opened in early September.  Our Community Place has made a commitment to install a Little Free Library.  It should be the next Little Free Library in Harrisonburg.

*

https://www.facebook.com/booksaversofvirginia/

http://giftandthrift.org/

**For more on the Little Library organization, see their website:

https://littlefreelibrary.org/   https://littlefreelibrary.org/ourmap/

 

‡libraries currently stocked by Booksavers staff or volunteers.

Saving more books

New treasures at Booksavers of Virginia

“It was a dark and stormy night . . . “ lines often parodied which began Edward Bulwer-Lytton (English novelist) 1830 novel Paul Clifford.

Last week I researched a book with these lines:

“Who could think of love within the haunt of the temple of  ‘That Nympholepsy of some fond despair’ and not feel that love enhanced, deepened, modulated into at once a deepened desire.” (Godolphin, p. 183, 1833 published by Carey)

These stirring lines were from the first edition of the novel. This edition was published just after the English Reform Bill of 1832 was passed. This bill reduced the power of the noblility by extending the voting franchise. Lytton’s satire was highly critical of the actions and views of bill’s opponents. He later revised the novel (1840) to soften the portrayal of the nobility. It took me some searching to determine that the Carey edition was different than the later ones for which there are many publishers. No other vendors offered a copy for sale. I had to guess on a price for the quarter leather bound volume with marbled covers and darkened pages. Value? Somewhere between $50 and $300. (I put a conservative $69.)

A. J. Trask   Music [Selections of piano sheet music from 1840-1860]

When I saw the large, worn leather bound volume, I knew it would be a problem. The title, stamped on the front, was a name: A. J. Trask. This was a collection of piano music. Several pages were sticking out beyond the others and page edge trimming was irregular. On opening the volume, I found no contents page. Paging through the book, I found many tears from probably resulting from the quick turning of pages as the pianist played—they were about 1/3rd of the way up the page.

But then I recognized some of the titles, especially those by Stephen Foster. The volume contains around 40 pieces of sheet music including:  “Song of the robin” and “Romance”, George William Warren;  “The last rose of summer : with an intro./ brilliant variations for the piano forte”, Firth, 1856?;  “The last waltz of a lunatic”,  Beyer, Ferdinand,  New York : Firth, 1850s; “The rainbow schottisch”, H Kleber;  “George W Quidor”, Firth 1854; “Gentle Annie  ballad”, Stephen Collins Foster, 1856 [1st ed.]; also, “Camptown Races”; “Ethiopian Melody. As Sung by Christy Minstrels”, “Nelly was a lady”.  Firth, 1849(?); “He doeth all things well, or, My sister : a ballad”, I B Woodbury.

I had trouble putting a price on this. I knew it could be worth more than the $25 I put on it.

—I posted it to Amazon and found out that it sold the next day. Did I put too low a price on it?

 

 

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The Methodist Episcopal Hymnal (1852) has solid leather covers with some wear and cracks at hinges.  Gilt lettering and design on spine is easily readable.  On front are the words  “Cool Spring M. E. Church FROM Mamie Dashiell”.

On the fly in pencil (faintly):  “This book belongs to Thomas R. Gentry  I bought it of a lady at Lincoln Station and give $5.00 dollars in Confedret (sic) money” [according too?] Phebe A Gentry This book was bought November 28, 1862.  Thomas Gentry died in 1881 at age of 43 according to a slip of paper inserted in the hymnal.

(Methodist Episcopal Hymnals for this period are not expensive ($15-$25). How much does the note on the fly add to the value?  I was unable to locate a “Cool Spring M. E. Church” with a limited search.)

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